CRISPR’d pig kidneys for xenotransplantation

Last week, the biotech firm eGenesis supplied a donor kidney sourced from a genome-edited pig to a surgical team at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) in the US. The donated kidney was transplanted into a patient with end-stage renal disease whose existing kidney transplant (‘allotransplanted’ from a human) was wearing out. The FDA had granted an expanded access authorisation for the procedure and, as of today’s date, the patient is reported to be doing well.

It is not clear to me from any of the materials online how exactly the pig was edited, other than that it was broadly subject to CRISPR/Cas9 editing of three kinds. First, there was so-called knock out editing of the glycan antigens (which lead to hyperacute rejection); second, there was knock in editing of seven human transgenes, which are thought to help with ‘acceptance’ (or which mitigate immunogenic rejection); and, finally, there was editing directed towards inactivating the genes known to cause porcine endogenous retroviruses (PERVs).

In total, eGenesis and MGH report that sixty-nine (69) discrete gene edits were made. That appears to be a record for a xenotransplantation, because the previous two pig-derived heart xenotransplants from 2022 and 2023 in the US are reported to have only been subject to about 10 edits.

I am assuming that the edits were made to the germline cells of a pig embryo fertilised in the laboratory, as opposed to being made on primordial germ cells or embryonic stem cells, but I am not able to find any specific protocols for this firm’s method. I suspect that somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT; ie, cloning) was not used, even though SCNT is technically legal in the US. In any event, I wrote a piece for the Conversation on some of the issues arising in relation to this recent news item here.